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Sir Henry Fermor Church of England Primary School

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Sir Henry Fermor

Church of England Primary School

Tel: 01892 652405

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Music

Music at Sir Henry Fermor School

We offer a high quality music education to engage and inspire pupils so that they develop a love of music and their talent as musicians, which increases their self-confidence, creativity and sense of achievement.

The music curriculum for all year groups is made up of the following strands:

• Exploring and controlling pulse, rhythm, pitch, speed ( tempo ) loudness

( dynamics ) and sound quality through singing, body sounds (e.g. clapping) and a variety of percussion instruments

• Learning a range of cross-curricular songs and hymns, in preparation for the various seasonal Christian festivals and monthly church services, as well as for the Key stage productions throughout the year

• Learning to play melodic instruments, such as tuned percussion, including gaining experience of playing some orchestral instruments in class

• Performing music to a wide variety of audiences with expression and confidence

• Composing and improvising new music to demonstrate an understanding of musical skills and themes

• Listening to and discussing a wide variety of musical performances from different genres, both live and recorded

 

In addition to the weekly class lessons, we are supported by the East Sussex Music School teachers and Red Butler, who offer individual and small group lessons at school on instruments such as guitar, flute, ukelele, drums, fife, clarinet, violin and keyboard. We are currently looking to expand the provision of instruments, to include more orchestral ones in the future and singing lessons.

 

There are various events throughout the year when the children get the chance to perform live in front of an audience, such as church festivals, carol singing and the end of year summer concert. We are looking into attending and hosting vocal and instrumental workshops in the future.

 

We have a flourishing school choir, presently open to all children in Year 3-6, and a school orchestra, again open to children from Year 3-6. Both perform regularly in school and in the wider community at events, such as the Christmas Fair, carol singing at local Nursing Homes and and at the Summer Fair. Highlights have included the choir performing at the Proms4Praise Concert at the Royal Albert Hall in London and at All Saints Church, Crowborough, where they were accompanied by a professional symphony orchestra.

 

Aims for the future are to further expand the musical opportunities, both in class and for the extra-curricular ensembles, including at competition level where appropriate, in order to promote music and performing arts at the school. 

Music Curriculum Overview 

 

EYFS

 

Marvellous Me

EYFS

Instrumentation- Introduce the names of different musical instruments. Explain how to handle each instrument correctly.

Role- play instrument area experimenting with different instruments.

To be able to listen to a piece of live or recorded music and respond physically when led by the teacher (e.g. to pulse and changes in dynamics, tempo, mood etc.)

To carry out various activities with the use of body percussion.

 

Vocalising and Singing- Learn to sing nursery rhymes and other simple songs. Learn and perform a variety of simple songs.

Perform a piece of music they have learnt either solo, in groups or as a class.

To explore using their voice in different ways (e.g. animal sounds, whispering, singing, speaking).

 

Moving and Dancing-Dance and move to simple songs. Learn and perform a variety of simple songs.

Being imaginative: They represent their own ideas, thoughts and feelings through music singing or dancing with expression.

 

 

Year 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Location Detectives

Year 1

 

 

 

 

 

Perform- Learn a variety of simple songs.

Perform them in pairs, on their own or as a class.

Rehearse and perform to others.

To perform simple songs from memory

To know how to use their voice in different ways

To find their singing voice

To sing collectively at the same pitch

Use their voices expressively and creatively by singing songs and speaking chants and rhymes.

 

Tuned/ unturned instruments- Instrument detectives. Investigate the different sounds the instruments make in the orchestra.

To begin to explore using their “thinking voice”

To be able to play a percussion instrument.

To further develop body percussion.

To begin to play the pulse on a percussion instrument.

 

Listen- Sound detectives. To listen to a variety of music from a range of cultures, traditions and historical periods.

Look at the instruments in more detail.

Hear what each instrument in the orchestra sounds like.

Fill water bottles with different dried objects and shake them. Listen to the different sounds they make. Can they tell you which one is which without looking?

To be able to copy a short rhythm.

To be able to find the pulse of a piece of music.

To be able to clap the pulse

 

Compose- Compose your own detective sound score. Can use detective Dog, or Detective Ted as a base for their story.

Create, repeat, adapt and extend simple rhythmic and melodic patterns and words as appropriate to given or chosen stimuli.

 

Notation- To respond to simple visual cues (e.g. stop, go, loud, quiet)

 

Technology- Refer to technology curriculum

Can use- (purple mash for music). (2 simple)

 

Year 2

 

Time Team

Year 2

 

Perform- Perform their compositions in pairs, on own or in groups.

Pupils to rehearse and perform with others.

Learn a variety of simple songs.

To play tuned and untuned instruments musically

Use their voices expressively and creatively by singing songs and speaking chants and rhymes.

To accurately pitch simple melodies- begin to pitch small intervals with a good degree of accuracy.

 

Tuned/ unturned instruments- Recap the different instruments in the orchestra. Can they remember any of their names? Investigate the sounds of the different instruments.

Link instruments to periods in time e.g: Bonfire night, Christmas        music. Would you use? Wooden instruments, brass, tin, metal to represent different things? (Look at the music of Handel and his History).

To be able to play the pulse on a percussion instrument.

 

Listen- To be able to beat the pulse of a piece of music.

Choose and maintain an appropriate pulse

Identify the difference between pulse and rhythm

Know that Pitch means “high and low”

Identify high and low sounds when listening to a piece of

recorded music

To listen carefully and develop their aural memory.

To express an opinion after listening to a piece of live or recorded music.

 

Compose- Compose a piece of musical sound scape for a particular period of time for example Bonfire night or Christmas.

Experiment with, create, select and combine sounds using the inter-related dimensions of music.

Create, repeat, adapt and extend simple rhythmic and melodic patterns and words as appropriate to given or chosen stimuli or in play contexts.

 

Notation- To use a simple graphic score for performing or as a stimulus for composition Begin to recognise and musically demonstrate awareness of a link between shape and pitch using graphic notations

 

Technology- Refer to technology curriculum

Year 3

Early Man: Digging It!

Year 3

 

Performance-Rehearse composition for final performance for others. To develop an understanding of breathing, posture, phrasing, dynamics and accuracy of pitch.

To sing a song in tune with expression.

Learn to play the recorder

 

Improvise/Compose- Begin to compose their own music of a period in time.

Children learn to recognise how sounds can be used to describe different animals or people. Use this understanding to create their own music in pairs, add movement and narration.

 

Listening/ Musical appreciation- - Look at the percussion section of the orchestra and the different materials they are made of. Begin to group them.

Introduce the recorder and how to play it.

Discussing and using musical notation for rhythm and pitch. During these activities pupils will explore how the elements of pitch, duration, dynamics and tempo can be combined to describe different sounds.

Listen to the music from the Flintstones.

Listen to the Early Man soundtrack.

 

 

Use and understand Staff notation- Introduce different staves (bass and treble clef) talk about the different notes and what they look like. (For example a minim has a white head and a crotchet has a black head). Pupils to practise clapping the rhythm.

To introduce how to play the recorder.

 

Develop an understanding of Music History- Early man would use the drums for passing on messages to different towns. Experiment with this- percussion section of the orchestra link. Early man music on Youtube.

 

Technology- Refer to technology curriculum

Year 4

Battles and Biomes

Year 4

 

Performance-Perform in pairs, on their own in groups playing an instrument. Encourage the use of the recorder to accompany their performance.

Know how to improve tone production and diction (vocal techniques).

To sing within an appropriate vocal range with clear diction, mostly accurate tuning and control of breathing.

 

Compose-Battle music. Create a graphic music score to a story.

Children learn to recognise how sounds can be used to describe different animals or people. Use this understanding to create their own music in pairs, add movement and narration.

 

Listening/ Musical appreciation- What instruments you could use to represent a battle. Investigate the percussion section of the orchestra.

Discussing and using musical notation for rhythm and pitch.

Listen to the music of Holst the planets in particular “Mars the planet of War.”

 

Use and understand Staff notation- Look at the characteristics of different music e.g: Structure, tempo, rhythm, tunes, words and actions and how they link to the notes on scores.

To begin to use the Italian symbols for dynamics in their own compositions.

To understand how pitch is represented on a stave

To further develop knowledge of the recorder.

 

Develop an understanding of Music History- To appreciate and understand a wide range of high-quality live and recorded music drawn from different traditions and from great composers and musicians.

 

Technology- Refer to technology curriculum

 

 

Year 5

 

Hot Chocolate

Year 5

 

 

Performance- Rehearse composition for final performance for others. Add movement and narration to their performances.

Play and perform in solo and ensemble contexts with increasing accuracy, fluency, control and expression.

Sing within an appropriate vocal range with clear diction, accurate tuning, control of breathing and communicating an awareness of style (Year 5 and 6 Objectives)

Make improvements to their own work, commenting on intended  

effect using appropriate musical vocabulary.

 

Compose- Children learn to recognise how sounds can be used to describe different chocolate.

Pupils will learn the relationship between lyrics and melody.

Improvise and compose music for a range of purposes using the inter-related dimensions of music

Improvise within given or chosen parameters (e.g. structures, using particular scales/notes etc.)

 

Listening/ Musical appreciation- Look at the instruments they have in North and South America, Brazil and Mexico (topic in Geography).

Listen with attention to detail and recall sounds with increasing aural memory.

Look at Latin American, Jazz, Mexican, blues, Cajun, country music.

Look at a variety of music and discuss using musical terminology.

Jungle music- Aztec music. (Links to Geography).

 

Use and understand Staff notation- To be able to follow a notated melody line as an aid to vocal performance.

 

Develop an understanding of Music History- To appreciate and understand a wide range of high-quality live and recorded music drawn from different traditions and from great composers and musicians.

 

Technology- Refer to technology curriculum. To be able to combine layers of sound using Music Technology software (e.g. Garage Band).

Year 6

All About Us

Year 6

 

Performance- Play or sing a complicated melody and maintain it as part of a multi-layered ensemble piece.

Maintain an independent part in a group or as a soloist when singing or playing, for example when part singing, showing an awareness of how parts fit together.

Confidently learn how to sing harmony, singing songs in two parts.

Accompany a performance with the recorder.

 

Compose- Create a piece of music that represents you.

Improvise and compose music for a range of purposes using the inter-related dimensions of music

Improvise confidently vocally and with instruments from a range of given and chosen stimuli

 

Listen/ Musical appreciation- Listen with attention to detail and recall sounds with increasing aural memory.

Suggest improvements to their own and others’ work, comment on how intentions have been achieved.

To appreciate and understand a wide range of high-quality live and recorded music drawn from different traditions and from great composers and musicians

To describe, compare and evaluate different kinds of music using appropriate vocabulary

Listen to “The young persons guide to the orchestra.” Listen to the rhythm and the timbre of the piece. Any sustained notes, short notes, where does it get louder or softer?

Look at a variety of music and discuss using musical terminology.

To accurately name common individual instruments when listening to a piece of music.

To know the elements of music and to be able to show understanding of these by applying appropriately when describing a piece of music.

 

Use and understand Staff notation- To develop use of notation with increasing confidence.

Develop the use of notation on different staves.

 

Develop an understanding of Music History-Understand the History of the ‘Young persons guide to the orchestra’ and why it was written. Understand how the orchestra has changed.

 

Technology- To be able to edit and manipulate sounds using Music Technology software (e.g. Garage Band, Audacity).

 

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